Getting hands on at the workshop. Photo by Jon Bird 2010.

Getting hands on at the workshop. Photo by Jon Bird 2010.

Prototyping a tilt sensor. Photo by Jon Bird 2010.

Prototyping a tilt sensor. Photo by Jon Bird 2010.

A prototype system for teaching illiterate farmers the effects of irrigating their fields at particular times. Photo by Hannah Perner-Wilson 2010.

A prototype system for teaching illiterate farmers the effects of irrigating their fields at particular times. Photo by Hannah Perner-Wilson 2010.

Building a sensor. Photo by Hannah Perner-Wilson 2010.

Building a sensor. Photo by Hannah Perner-Wilson 2010.

Prototype physical tags. Photo by Jon Bird 2010.

Prototype physical tags. Photo by Jon Bird 2010.

An interactive textile map of the world for visualising data. Photo by Jon Bird 2010.

An interactive textile map of the world for visualising data. Photo by Jon Bird 2010.

A wearable system that allows cyclists to record unsafe locations. Photo by Hannah Perner-Wilson 2010.

A wearable system that allows cyclists to record unsafe locations. Photo by Hannah Perner-Wilson 2010.

Nudge, Nudge, Wink, Wink

An Interdisciplinary Workshop on the Efficacy and Ethics of Using Nudge Techniques to Change Behaviour

10.30 – 16.30 Wednesday 4 May, 2011

Meeting Room 1, Jennie Lee Building, The Open University, Milton Keynes

Click here for more information on this workshop

Physical Computing Workshops

In collaboration with the High-Low Tech Group from the MIT Media Lab, the CHANGE project organized two physical computing workshops from 1-3 June, 2010, at Lighthouse, Brighton. The first, one day workshop, was aimed at introducing beginners to using the Arduino microcontroller. The second, which lasted two days, was aimed at people with some experience of physical computing and focused on how to use textiles to build sensors. Its theme was 'Better Living through Technology' and participants worked in groups to design and prototype a variety of systems that could potentially change behaviour and improve people's quality of life: a system for helping illiterate farmers understand and plan when to irrigate their fields; an enhanced version of geocaching using physical tags to encourage people to get out and explore their environments; an interactive textile map of the world for visualizing data; and a system for cyclists to record when they felt at risk so that the data could used to improve road safety.

The workshops were led by:

  • Leah Buechley
  • Jon Bird
  • Emily Lovell
  • David Mellis
  • Hannah Perner-Wilson
  • Hannah Perner-Wilson has a Flickr stream of photos from the workshops.

    Participants' Feedback

    Have wanted to learn about Arduino boards for years – but never quite done so. It’s great to be able to learn in such a handson way, and with a diverse group. It’s also fantastic to have people from MIT here who are applying this technology in such interesting ways. I have yet to work out a useful application of all this for social development but I’m very keen to learn more. Thanks….
    Tessa Lewin - Sussex University

    I came here today with no experience of Arduino and only the corroding memories of high school electronics. It took barely an hour or two to learn more than enough to begin serious prototyping of systems. An extremely useful and instructive system for prototyping, development and casual play. Thanks …
    Rich Snow - Swansea University

    Great introduction to Arduino, thank you. I’ve heard about it and have been interested to learn more for the last couple of years, but not felt confident to try myself. Today was a very clear, wellplaced intro and inspiration with lots of knowledgeable support. Looking forward to playing with it much more, and planning some exciting projects….
    Jackie Calderwood – De Monfort University

    Thanks for the opportunity to attend and take part in the one-day Introductory Workshop. I enjoyed having those “what you didn’t know, you didn’t know” experiences, helping lay the foundations of what I’ll need to know to carry on doing great work. Thanks for the Arduino kit….
    Will Pearson - Newcastle University

    A truly great experience, great step towards understanding of computers, and a huge help for innovating ubiquitous devices. Once one has access to the board, the components and a clever explanation in the way delivered today, things seem so simple! I wish there was more time for the workshop. All the best and thanks a lot….
    Malte Ressin – Thames Valley University

    Thank you very much for this inspirational workshop and the patience you had. Looking forward to the “expert” workshop and experimenting with even more materials and sensors. Thanks a lot. Really enjoyed it….
    Ines Amado – De Montfort

    Found the whole workshop really enjoyable. I had some experience with these sensors and languages before, but working with such experts helped to consolidate my understanding of these tools. Met lots of lovely people, and enjoyed banging around design ideas, thinking about possible future collaborations. Thanks you…
    Madeline Balaam - Sussex University

    Really enjoyed the workshop and learned a lot. I didn’t know much to start with. I’ll definitely try to do more of these in the future…
    Paul Marshall – Open University

    This course has been like some kind of magical dream! I never imagined I would make my own tilt sensor or pressure sensor! Always wanted to be an inventor and now I can be – my mind is awash with ideas and I cant wait to get started. Very empowering. I feel amazingly lucky to have been given this opportunity and delighted by the whole experience – great people, fantastic ideas, lovely location and absolutely everything thought of and provided….
    Maya Kar - UCL

    Very interesting and useful course! Excellent organisation too!!! And exciting people – what a combination….
    Hien Nguyen - Aberdeen University

    It was a great experience working with the textile material and working with people from diverse backgrounds. Thanks for the opportunity….
    Renan Krishnan - Sussex University

    A really enjoyable experience. A great opportunity to learn about arduinos and work with new materials that I have never seen before. The knowledge gained over the two days will no doubt help with my future studies into wearable devices. Such an amazing area of research. Thanks you to all involved, for your time and energy.
    Emma Thom – Swansea University

    Enjoyed the workshop very much and regret that it didn’t last longer to work more on materials, different sensors, ideas and inspirations. It was definitely motivating to continue working with physical computing and prototyping. Thanks you very much
    Eva Ganglbauer - Vienna University

    Really enjoyed taking a more hands on approach to the subject and using the materials. Very good hosting and location. Like to do it again…...
    Jim Wood - Goldsmiths

    Very enjoyeable, thank you! I really engaged and can see the value in use of fabrics. Cheers,
    Danny Matthews - Sussex University

    I have never programmed an Arduino before today and this workshop, in very short time, taught me how to turn information into commands that a computer could understand. Thank you for helping me to programme an Arduino.
    Ruben F Brett-Lawson - Brighton